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What You Need to Know About the Different Types of Lenses

Have you ever wondered what the lenses in your glasses are made of? You might remember your optician discussing various lenses and coatings with you, but maybe you weren’t SURE what they were talking about. You might have even thought your lenses were made of glass — after all, they call them glasses, right?

It’s important to know what you’re getting however; not only so you know what things cost, but so you can get comfortable glasses that are safe and, of course, help you see properly.

Let’s take a look at the various lens materials and coatings available on the market today. This will help you understand the different types of lenses available to correct your vision and provides a comfortable view of the world.

Glass
They may be the “glass” in glasses, but you might have a hard time finding glass lenses today. While they offer great optical quality, compared to the other types of lenses on the market, they are can easily break and are much heavier. But they aren’t all bad: Glass lenses are scratch resistant.

Should you get glass lenses? It depends on if you can find them or not, really. Check out the pros and cons for glass lenses:

Pros of Glass Lenses
● Scratch resistant (unlike other lenses, doesn’t need scratch-resistance coating)
● Great optical quality

Cons of Glass Lenses
● Might be hard to find
● Heavier than other types of lenses
● Can easily chip, break or shatter
● No UV protection

Recommended Coatings
● UV protection
● Anti-reflective coating

plastic lenses, coated, glass lenses

Plastic Lenses
Many lenses are made out of plastics, specifically a plastic called “Columbia Resin 39” or CR-39 for short. They are lightweight, thin and have more impact resistance than glass lenses. (However, they can still break and shatter if dropped, etc., and aren’t as tough as polycarbonate lenses.) They also have good optical quality.

Should you get plastic lenses? Relatively inexpensive lenses that can easily be tinted for color, plastic lenses are a great option for your glasses. But when compared to other types of lenses, they do have their flaws. Check out the pros and cons for plastic lenses:

Pros of Plastic Lenses
● Lightweight
● Inexpensive (compared to other lenses)
● More impact-resistant than glass lenses
● Thin
● Easily tinted

Cons of Plastic Lenses
● No UV protection
● Not as impact-resistant compared to polycarbonate lenses
● Easily scratched
● Not as thin compared to other types of lenses (but thinner than glass)

Recommended coatings
● UV coating
● Scratch-resistance coating

Polycarbonate lenses can take a beating… Which makes them great for kids. (But don’t forget to get a scratch-resistant coating!)trailer film Nervous Laughter 2017

Polycarbonate Lenses
Polycarbonate lenses have been described as the “Superman” of glasses lenses. These lenses are “impact-resistant” lenses, and can some take rough handling. They are lightweight and also protect your eyes from UV lighting. They are also recommended for rimless glasses, because the chances of them shattering and breaking are less that other types of lenses.

Should you get polycarbonate lenses? Most experts recommend polycarbonate lenses in safety glasses, and also in glasses for athletes and children. But should you get them too? Check out the pros and cons for polycarbonate lenses:

Pros of Polycarbonate Lenses
● 100% UV protection
● Impact-resistant
● Lightweight
● Less likely to break
● Great for athletes and children

Cons of Polycarbonate Lenses
● Can be expensive compared to plastic lenses
● Easily scratched
● Insurance may not cover cost for adults

Recommended Coatings
● Scratch resistance coating
● Anti-reflective coating

Trivex Lenses
Trivex lenses are really similar to polycarbonate lenses. They are lightweight, impact-resistant, and recommended for children and athletes. Compared to polycarbonate lenses however, they are much lighter and Trivex lenses offer better vision quality. They do however, have many of the same flaws.

Should you get Trivex lenses? Trivex may have similar qualities to polycarbonate lenses, but the key differences might make them a better option. Check out the pros and cons of Trivex lenses:

Pros of Trivex Lenses
● Lightweight (the lightest of all lenses)
● Impact-resistant
● 100% UV-protection
● Optical clarity better than polycarbonate
● Great for children and athletes

Cons of Trivex Lenses
● Easily scratched
● Varies, but it can be more expensive than polycarbonate lenses
● Lens aren’t as thin as polycarbonate (but are lighter)

Recommended Coatings
● Scratch resistance coating
● Anti-reflective coating

High Index Plastic Lenses
If you have a strong prescription, you might think you’re going to end up with glasses with thick lenses, also known as “soda bottle” glasses. But never fear! High index plastic lenses are your answer! They are as lightweight as plastic lenses, but thinner too.

So why are they different than other lenses? High index plastic lenses have a higher “index of refraction” than other lenses. What’s that mean? Well, glasses bend or refract light through your lenses so you can see. Certain lenses have a limit to how much they can bend light, and to correct it, you generally needed thicker lenses (hence, the “soda bottle” name). High index plastic lenses eliminate that.

Should you get high index lenses? If you have a strong prescription that would normally call for thick lenses in your glasses, then yes! Check out some of the pros and cons of high index plastic lenses too:

Pros of High Index Plastic Lenses
● No more “soda bottle” lenses
● Lighter than plastic
● Thinner than plastic

Cons of High Index Plastic Lenses
● No UV protection
● More lens reflection (highly recommended to get anti-reflective coating)
● Easily scratched

Recommended Coatings
● Scratch resistance
● Anti-reflective coating

Aspheric Lenses
If aspheric lenses had a motto, it’d be “thinner is better.” Most lenses have a spherical curve to them, which sometimes creates a bug-eyed or beady-eyed effect, depending on the thickness of the lenses. Aspheric lenses are much thinner than other lenses types, and don’t create that same effect. They also reduce distortions when you’re looking away from the center of your lenses too. Many aspheric lenses are also high index plastic lenses as well.

Should you get aspheric lenses? If you are looking for a thinner and flatter lens, aspheric lenses might be for you. Check out some of the pros and cons of aspheric lenses.

Pros of Aspheric Lenses:
● Thinner
● Lightweight
● Flatter appearance
● · Reduces the “bug-eye/beady-eye” effect
● Less distortions: Wide frame of view and better peripheral vision

Cons of Aspheric Lenses
● Generally more expensive than regular plastic lenses
● More lenses reflection (highly recommended to get anti-reflective coating)

Recommended Coatings
● Scratch resistance
● Anti-reflective coating

Photochromic Lenses
Want sunglasses without a whole other pair of glasses? Then photochromic lenses, also known as transition lenses, might be a great option for you. These lenses automatically darken in sunlight, and clear up indoors. They provide UV protection, too, and come in most lenses types, including high-index lenses.

Photochromic lenses do a few flaws however. In cars, they might not darken. Car windows usually offer UV protection, which might not reach your glasses and will keep them from darkening. Another flaw is they may take time to fade back to normal if you go from outdoors to indoors, especially after you’ve spent a long time outdoors.live streaming movie Rings online

Also, if you need darker lenses while outdoors, especially if you’re sensitive to bright lights, photochromic lenses might not be dark enough.

Should you get photochromic lenses? They can be more expensive than a regular pair of glasses, but they also mean you don’t need sunglasses. Check out the pros and cons of photochromic lenses:

Pros of Photochromic Lenses
● Darken in sunlight, normal lenses indoors
● Saves money since you don’t have to buy prescription sunglasses too
● Comes in most lenses materials and types, including high-index
● UV protection

Cons of Photochromic Lenses
● Can be a more expensive investment
● May take time to lighten going from outdoors to indoors
● Might not darken in cars
● Might not get dark enough

Recommended coatings
● Depends on the lenses you choose, but you don’t have to worry about UV protection!

As you can see, there are many different types of lens materials out there. Talk to your optician about the best kind for you. And if you ever find yourself in need of fixing your frames for your glasses, head over to FixMyGlasses.com.

The Long Term Effects of Blue Light How to Find the Perfect Eye Wear Frames The Best Sunglasses for Athletes Know Your Eye Glass Measurements Over 40 and Your Vision Changed Overnight – Meet Presbyopia Eye Health Matters, Too! Why You Need Routine Eye Exams What You Need to Know About the Different Types of Lenses Eye Glass Frame Adjustment Tips Sunglasses – Don’t leave home without them

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